2015/16 New Faculty

History

Denise DemetriouDenise Demetriou

Associate Professor
Ranglas Endowed Chair in Ancient Greek History
Appointment effective 7/1/15

Dr. Demetriou received her Ph.D. in Classics from The Johns Hopkins University in 2005.  She was awarded the Mary Isabel Sibley Fellowship for Greek Studies in 2005-2006 and the Loeb Classical Library Foundation Fellowship in 2009-2010.  Prior to her appointment at UCSD, Dr. Demetriou taught for nine years in the History Department at Michigan State University.

Dr. Demetriou has been recognized for her excellence in undergraduate teaching at Michigan State, where students named her a Learning Leader three times.  She also received the History Department’s Thomas Buschell Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching.  At UCSD she will teach undergraduate and graduate courses in ancient Greek history.

Claire EdingtonClaire Edington

Assistant Professor
Appointment effective 7/1/15

Claire Edington received her PhD in the History and Ethics of Public Health (Department of Sociomedical Sciences) from Columbia University in 2013. Before joining the faculty at UCSD, she was a postdoctoral fellow in the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard University from 2013-2014 and an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts-Boston from 2014-2015.

Professor Edington's research interests include the history of medicine and public health, the history of the French empire, and Southeast Asian Studies, especially the history of Vietnam. She is currently completing a book manuscript on the social history of psychiatry and mental illness in French colonial Vietnam. Her next project will examine the history of drug policy in Southeast Asia from the colonial period to the present, focusing on the collision of local approaches to drug users with international discourses around public health and human rights.

Her research has been supported by the National Institutes of Health, Columbia University's Weatherhead East Asian Institute, and the Mellon Foundation. In spring 2014, she was awarded the Jack D. Pressman-Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Development Award by the American Association for the History of Medicine for outstanding work in twentieth-century history of medicine or biomedical sciences, as demonstrated by the completion of the PhD and a proposal to turn the dissertation into a publishable monograph. Her work has appeared in Comparative Studies in Society and History, Journal of Global Public Health and Journal of Health Policy, Politics and Law

Professor Edington teaches introductory courses in the history of European imperialism and the history of global health, as well as specialized courses in the history of medicine and psychiatry, modern Southeast Asian history and the history of drugs and drug policy.

Simeon ManSimeon Man

Assistant Professor
Appointment effective 7/1/15

Dr. Man received his Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale University in 2012.  Before his appointment at UC San Diego, he held an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship at Northwestern University in 2012-14 and a Provost’s Postdoctoral Scholarship at the University of Southern California in 2014-15.  His primary areas of interest include U.S. history in a global perspective, transpacific wars and migration, race and politics, and Asian American history.  He is currently at work on his first book, Soldiering through Empire: Race and the Making of the Decolonizing Pacific, which is under contract with the University of California Press.  The book is a study of the U.S. military in Asia after World War II, and tells of how diverse Asian subjects came to be mobilized by the U.S. state for the war in Vietnam (1950-1975), and in turn transformed the politics of race, nation, and empire in the second half of the twentieth century.  He has published in the edited anthology, The Rising Tide of Color: Race, State, Violence, and Radical Movements Across the Pacific (edited by Moon-Ho Jung, University of Washington Press, 2014), and will have forthcoming essays in the American Quarterly and the Oxford Handbook of Asian American History.  Dr. Man will teach undergraduate and graduate courses on Asian American history, social movements, race and wars in American culture, and the United States and the world.

Wendy MatsumuraWendy Matsumura

Assistant Professor

Appointment effective 7/1/15

Dr. Matsumura received her Ph.D. in History from New York University in 2007. Her dissertation project on modern Okinawan history was funded by a Fulbright dissertation fellowship from 2002 to 2004. Following a visiting professorship at Otterbein College in Westerville, OH, Dr. Matsumura was assistant professor of History and Asian Studies at Furman University in Greenville, SC from 2009-2015. The completion of her first book, The Limits of Okinawa (Duke University Press, 2015) and research for her next project was supported by a Fulbright research fellowship in Kyoto from 2012-2013. She is currently working on two major research projects: the first on the unfolding of transnational labor struggles across Japan’s prewar sugar empire and the second on the emergence of the concept of surplus labor in Japanese social scientific discourse. Dr. Matsumura will teach undergraduate and graduate courses on the development of class antagonisms, gender oppression and racialized discourses in the Japanese empire. She values the diverse range of life experiences, political commitments and learning styles that her students bring to the study of modern Japan.


Literature

Erin SuzukiErin Suzuki

Assistant Professor
Appointment effective 7/1/15

Dr. Suzuki received a B.A. magna cum laude in English literature from Brown University in 2000 and her Ph.D. in English literature at UCLA in 2010. She held an Assistant Professor position at Emory University from 2012 to 2015. An innovative scholar, Professor Suzuki has authored several significant articles in the fields of Asian American, Diasporic and Transpacific Studies and is completing a book project entitled Sacred Travelers: Competing Diasporas in the Transpacific Imagination. She has been awarded fellowships and research grants from the Ford Foundation, the Stout Research Centre, and UCLA. Professor Suzuki has a broad range of teaching interests that include Asian American literatures, science fiction, transpacific discourses, and transnational perspectives on American literatures. Beyond her expertise as a scholar of Asian American and transpacific literatures, Professor Suzuki is a gifted theorist who is especially adept at showing students – both graduate and undergraduate – the rewards of examining cultural categories on the basis of historical nuance and the close reading of primary texts and theoretical texts. The promotion of diverse perspectives has been key in Professor Suzuki’s role as a teacher and scholar. At UCLA, Professor Suzuki taught for 4 years in an academic access and equity program for first generation college students from underrepresented communities. In this context, she had the opportunity to design a first-year writing course for first-generation and nontraditional college students. Her experience in this program gave her the skills to negotiate complex dynamics that can arise in a classroom setting; to develop learning strategies for differently abled learners; and to advocate for the success of all students, preparing them for bright futures.


Music

Erik CarlsonErik Carlson

Assistant Professor
Appointment effective 7/1/15

Violinist Erik Carlson has performed as a soloist and with many chamber and orchestral ensembles throughout Europe and the Americas. He is a highly active performer of contemporary music and has had works written for him by numerous composers, including Christian Wolff, Georges Aperghis, Jürg Frey, Peter Ablinger, Charles Wuorinen, Michael Finnissy, and Tom Johnson. Carlson is an enthusiastic proponent of interdisciplinary collaboration, and performs frequently with dancers, poets, and film.

Carlson's past and present ensemble memberships include the International Contemporary Ensemble, the Talea Ensemble, the Trinity Bach Players, the New York Miniaturist Ensemble (of which he was the founder) and the Theatre of Eternal Music String Ensemble. He has been featured on many recordings, ranging from the violin concertos of Antoine Beuger and Aldo Clementi, to chamber music of Milton Babbitt and Iannis Xenakis, to solo works of Johannes Kreidler and Zoltán Jeney. Also a composer, Carlson has had his musical compositions performed in a wide variety of venues. He studied with Robert Mann, Ronald Copes, and Jorja Fleezanis.

Natacha DielsNatacha Diels

Assistant Professor
Appointment effective 7/1/15

Natacha Diels’ work combines ritual, improvisation, traditional instrumental technique, and cynical play to create worlds of curiosity and unease. An accomplished composer and performer, Natacha’s unique musical approach continues to contribute to the ongoing development of new American experimentalism. She holds degrees from NYU and Columbia University.

Natacha founded the experimental music collective Ensemble Pamplemousse in 2003, and continues to be its executive director and flautist. In 2009 she co-founded the performance duo On Structure with Jessie Marino. Pamplemousse performs globally and has commissioned over 100 compositions from musically and demographically under­represented composers. Inexorably uncompromising,the group has developed its name by presenting exquisitely challenging music at both internationally recognized festivals such as MATA Festival (NY) and lesser-known gems such as Louisville’s Experimental Music Festival (KY).

With a focus on choreographed movement, traditional instrumental technique, and a wide array of DIY electronics, Natacha’s compositions have been described as “a fairy tale for a fractured world” (Music We Care About) and “fantastic playful modern chamber music full of magic and wit” (Vital Weekly). Natacha looks forward to engaging with the UCSD community of performers, composers, and programmers through creative collaboration. She will teach courses in computer music, electronic music production, and composition.


Theatre and Dance

Robert BrillRobert Brill

Professor
Appointment effective 7/1/15

Robert Brill is a UCSD Theatre alumnus (BA 1988), founding member of Sledgehammer Theater, 2013-14 Artist-in-Residence at the La Jolla Playhouse, recipient of both the Michael Merritt and Lucille Lortel awards, and two-time Tony Award nominee. His set designs for theatre, opera, dance, and commercial entertainment span three decades and have been seen internationally and in every major city in the United States.  

As a Broadway-based set designer, his stage credits include the critically acclaimed revival of Cabaret, Assassins (Tony Nomination), Guys and Dolls (Tony Nomination), A Streetcar Named Desire, Design for Living, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Buried Child and Jesus Christ Superstar, among others.  His regional theatre credits are extensive, from the likes of The Wiz and His Girl Friday at the La Jolla Playhouse, A Clockwork Orange at Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre, The Laramie Project at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, and numerous productions for The Stratford Festival of Canada, including Christopher Plummer’s A Word or Two.  As an opera designer, his work has been seen at the English National Opera in London, the Metropolitan Opera in New York, and in 2010, his design for the highly anticipated world-premiere of Moby-Dick was presented by Dallas Opera, and followed by productions in Australia, Canada and other cities in the US, including San Francisco Opera and Washington National Opera at The Kennedy Center. In 2015, he has designed three other world-premier opera productions: Cold Mountain, Santa Fe Opera; The Manchurian Candidate, Minnesota Opera; and Everest, Dallas Opera.  Robert Brill is an innovative artist and widely considered one of the leading figures in the American Theatre.

Professor Brill joins the nationally ranked MFA professional design training program where he will teach, supervise, and mentor all scenic design students in set design and professional preparation for careers in stage, film, TV, and/or commercial entertainment.  


Visual Arts

Erica ChoErica Cho

Assistant Professor
Appointment effective 7/1/15

Erica Cho is a visual artist who works in experimental film, short-form narrative, and LGBTQ and Asian American media art. Subjects include the intersection of settler-colonialism and climate change, and the history of Korean war and migration. She specializes in relief-printmaking, stop-motion animation, comics and drawing, and film editing.

Prior to UC San Diego, she was a Visiting Assistant Professor of Film and Media Studies at Swarthmore College and Film Curator for the Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival. L.A.-based work also includes film and television editing. Grants from Creative Capital Foundation, Leeway Foundation, California Community Foundation. She was honored as one of OUT Magazine's OUT100 for "remarkable contributions to LGBTQ culture.”

Monique Van GenderenMonique van Genderen

Assistant Professor
Appointment effective 7/1/15

Monique Van Genderen received a MFA from California Institute of the Arts. Her research involves studio art with an emphasis in painting, specifically abstract painting, specializing in new techniques and experimental materials; exploring issues of scale, its relationship to architecture and the exterior world beyond the gallery system and the balance of power between the masculine and the feminine; exhibition strategies exploring the conceptual and narrative relationships in painting.

Prior to UCSD, she exhibited extensively throughout the United States and Europe at museums and galleries for the past 15 years concurrently guest lecturing at UCLA and other Los Angeles art programs including Art Center, Otis College and Claremont Graduate School. She also had installations at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, Wexner Center for the Arts, Ohio, and Le Consortium, Dijon France all pursued the object in relationship to the spectacle of large-scale wall painting.