2007/08 New Faculty

Thomas Gallant

Professor
Department of History

Professor Gallant received his Ph.D. in Classical Archeology from Cambridge University in 1982. His dissertation was a surface survey of two of the Ionian Islands of Lefkas and Kefallenia, which led to seven articles and his book, Risk and Survival in Ancient Greece (1991), on ancient Greek archeology. His early field research on the Ionian Islands, traditionally called the Seven Islands—the island group from Corfu to Zante off the west coast of Greece that stretches south from the Albanian coast to the southern tip of the Peloponnese—shifted his scholarly interest to modern Greek history. With special focus on rural society and culture, crime and violence, masculinity and gender, cultural identity, colonial power and government, and the social history/historical anthropology of the Mediterranean, Professor Gallant has subsequently published more than 20 articles and two books, Modern Greece (2001) and Experiencing Dominion: Culture, Identity, and Power in the British Mediterranean (2002). Professor Gallant has also done research on the modern Greek diaspora and has co-authored a book on The 1918 Anti-Greek Riot in Toronto (2005), which became the basis for a 2006 OMNI television documentary, “Violent August” that he hosted and narrated. This book has received commendation from a concurrent resolution passed in the Canadian Parliament, and the National Ethnic Press and Media Council of Canada awarded him a national merit award in 2005 for “leadership, courage, and dedication in the promotion of multiculturalism, human rights, respect of human and cultural values, integrity and equality among all Canadians.” Professor Gallant’s other fellowships and awards include: co-investigator on ancient agroclimatology from the Economic and Social Research Council (UK) in 1982-1984 and again from the British Academy in 1988-1990; PI on the rural economy of Greece from the University of Florida and the American Philosophical Society in 1986; a fellowship from the Center for Hellenic Studies (Washington, D.C.) in 1988-1989; on modern Greece from the ACLS initiative in Eastern European Studies in 1991; on the topic of violence and law in nineteenth-century Greek society from the Harry F. Guggenheim Foundation and the University of Florida in 1995-1996, and the NSF Law and Social Sciences Program in 1999-2000. Professor Gallant taught at the University of Florida for 18 years (1984/85-2001/02) and comes to UCSD after teaching for the past five years (2001/02-2006/07) as the Hellenic Heritage Chair and Professor of History at York University in Toronto. At UCSD Professor Gallant will teach courses on modern Greek History, the Social History of Law, Crime, and Policing in Europe, 1700-1900, and Mediterranean Social History and Anthropology.

Catherina Gere

Assistant Professor
Department of History

Dr. Gere received her Ph.D. in History and Philosophy of Science from Cambridge University in 2001 with a dissertation that examines the relationship between intellectual modernism and the human sciences, seen through the contestation over the meaning of the Minoan ruins on Crete. Dr. Gere won a Wellcome Trust Research Grant to investigate the ethics of human tissue archiving, which was given in response to a major, highly publicized scandal in the British National Health System involving the routine retention, without consent, of human tissues that ranged from thin slices on pathology laboratory slides to whole hearts and brains. The project focused on the Cambridge University Hospital Brain Bank and Dr. Gere investigated the foundations of scientific materialism as related to both neuroscientific experimentation and scientific secularization of theological concerns. She and co-investigator Dr. Bronwyn Parry lobbied successfully for changes to the British Tissue Act (2004) on the basis of a new way of defining the material/informational divide in medical archiving. Dr. Gere’s present research continues to focus on the history of medical ethics. Upon completion of her Ph.D., Dr. Gere was a Lecturer in History and Philosophy of Science at Cambridge University, where she offered a diversity of courses including gender and science, the survey of the history of science, reproductive ethics, “Making Modern Medicine,” “Embryos, Ancestors, and the Unborn,” and led workshops at the Addenbrooke’s Hospital Clinical School on “How to be a Good Doctor: Historical Perspectives.” From 2005 to 2007, she taught as a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Morris Fishbein Center for the History of Science at the University of Chicago. At UCSD Dr. Gere will teach courses on the history of bioethics and the making of modern medicine.

Mark Hanna

Assistant Professor
Department of History

Dr. Hanna received his Ph.D. in history from Harvard University in 2006. He received graduate fellowships from the Center for New World Comparative Studies at the John Carter Brown Library, the W.M. Keck Foundation at the Huntington Library, and a Mark DeWolfe Howe Fund Postdoctoral Fellowship for research in Legal History from the Harvard University Law School. Dr. Hanna has also been awarded a two-year post-doctoral fellowship from the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture in Williamsburg, Virginia, for 2008-2010. Dr. Hanna’s dissertation, “The Pirate Nests: The Impact of Piracy on Newport and Charles Town, 1670-1730,” not only challenges prevailing interpretations of piracy; it also uses the phenomenon of piracy to illuminate the history of early America in the Atlantic World. His research is quintessentially multidisciplinary, with a legal historical base grounded in the Navigation Acts, early trials from the Admiralty courts, and shipping records; an interdisciplinary historical analysis of the economic underpinnings, social networks, and political support of pirate activity on land and sea; and the cultural nuance of print culture, both the literary world of historical fiction and the more ephemeral rough-and-tumble of early newspapers. Following four years as a Tutor and/or Teaching Fellow in Harvard’s History of American Civilization Program, History Department, and Core Curriculum (including one year as the Core Curriculum Head Teaching Fellow), Dr. Hanna taught three years as a Lecturer in Harvard’s History and Literature Program, during which time he won the Bok Center Teaching Award for each of his four classes, excluding tutorials. At UCSD he will teach courses on colonial United States history and the early modern Atlantic World.

Dennis Childs

Assistant Professor, African American Literature and Culture
Department of Literature

Dennis Childs received his Ph.D. in English at UC Berkeley in 2005.
He was the recipient of a Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship in 2004-05. His dissertation, Formations of Neoslavery: The Cultures and Politics of the American Carceral State, focuses on the institutional processes whereby forms of subjugation, forced labor and incarceration of black people persisted after Emancipation, and deals with ways in which African American culture registers these processes and resistance to them in literature and in song. Upon graduation,
Dr. Childs was awarded two postdoctoral fellowships, a Mellon Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship at UC Berkeley (which he declined), and a UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellowship under which he engaged in research at the UCLA School of Law, under the mentorship of Professor Cheryl Harris. Dr. Childs has written on literary works by Toni Morrison and other African American authors,
on the blues and folk musician Huddie Ledbetter, better known as Leadbelly, on canonical narratives by former slaves such as Harriet Wilson and Frederick Douglass, and on modern prison narratives by Malcolm X, George Jackson, and Assata Shakur. He has published an article, “Angola, Convict Leasing, and the Annulment of Freedom:
The Vectors of Architectural and Discursive Violence in the US ‘Slavery of Prison,’” in Violence and the Body, ed. Arturo Aldama ( Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2003). Dr. Childs will teach courses in African American literature and in our general curriculum in American literature; he will also offer courses for our new major in Cultural Studies, and for Thurgood Marshall College’s minor in African American Studies. He will also be an important resource for the Ethnic Studies Department which participated in a joint effort with the Literature Department in recruiting him to UCSD. Dr. Childs grew up in San Diego and was educated in local public schools, including Hoover High School where he has returned periodically to give informational and motivational talks. He will be an important asset to UCSD’s outreach efforts in San Diego and elsewhere, especially with respect to students from historically underrepresented communities.

Larissa Heinrich

Associate Professor, Modern Chinese Literature and Culture
Department of Literature

Larissa Heinrich received her MA in Chinese Literature (Pre-Modern and Republican) from Harvard University in 1995, and her PhD in Chinese Literature (Early Modern and Modern) from UC Berkeley in 2002. She was awarded a Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Grant for a year’s research in China while affiliated with the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences (2000-01), and received a Doctoral Dissertation Write-up Year Fellowship from the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for Scholarly Exchange (2001-02). She has also been the recipient of postdoctoral fellowships and grants from the Australian Academy of the Humanities (2004), and the Blakemore Foundation (2005). Since completing her PhD, Dr. Heinrich has taught at Reed College, the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, and the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. Her research and teaching interests are interdisciplinary, covering Chinese literature, visual culture, medical history, and the history of science. She is the author of The Afterlife of Images: Translating the Pathological Body Between China and the West (Duke, 2007), a meticulous study of the dissemination of medical knowledge via visual means and its far-reaching impact on modern Chinese literature and culture. Dr. Heinrich is also a co-editor (with Fran Martin) of a volume of original essays, Embodied Modernities: Corporeality and Representation in Chinese Culture s (Hawaii, 2006). She has also published research articles in academic journals such as History of Photography (2006)
and Positions (2007), as well as in edited volumes of scholarly essays.
Dr. Heinrich will teach undergraduate courses and graduate seminars in modern Chinese culture for the Literature Department and the Chinese Studies Program. She fills an important need in the modern period for Chinese Studies, and her areas of interest will enable her to contribute also to the Literature Department ’s new major in Cultural Studies. Dr. Heinrich will also be a valuable resource for other campus departments and programs such as Visual Arts, Science Studies, and Critical Gender Studies. Her teaching evaluations at institutions where she taught previously were consistently excellent, providing strong evidence that she will be an outstanding addition to our faculty.

Anthony Burr

Assistant Professor
Department of Music

Dr. Anthony Burr received his D.M.A. in Contemporary Music Performance from UCSD in 2004. He is known internationally as one of the leading interpreters of contemporary music for clarinet, having performed as soloist for many leading institutions including the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, The Ensemble Sospeso (New York), The Munich Biennale, and Elision (Australia). He has collaborated with many leading artists including Laurie Anderson, Alvin Lucier, and MacArthur Fellow John Zorn, and has created a series of live film/music performances with experimental filmmaker Jennifer Reeves. As a composer, he has specialized in the creation of epic scale mixed media pieces, most notably Biospheria: An Environmental Opera. Dr. Burr will offer individual instruction to clarinet students, coach chamber music performance, and teach Music 15 (Popular Music), Music 101 (Music Theory), and Music 207 (Theoretical Studies).

Lei Liang

Assistant Professor
Department of Music

Dr. Lei Liang received his Ph.D. in composition from Harvard University in 2006. Earlier he earned a MFA from the New England Conservatory of Music (1998) and was a Fellow of the Harvard Society of Fellows from 1998-2002. Dr. Liang is coming to UCSD from Middlebury College, where he was a Visiting Assistant Professor of music. He also has served as a Distinguished Visiting Professor at Shanxi Normal University College of Arts in Xi'an, China and Honorary Professor of Composition and Sound Design at Wuhan Conservatory of Music, China. Dr. Liang’s music has been performed throughout Europe, East and Southeast Asia, North and Latin America. He has received many commissions and performances include collaborations with the Heidelberger Philharmonisches Orchester, the Arditti String Quartet, the Ying Quartet, the Meridian Arts Ensemble, shakuhachi-soloist Reian Bennett, pianist Stephen Drury, saxophonist Chien-Kwan Lin, and erhu player Xu Ke. Dr. Liang was recognized with the Derek Bok Distinguished Teaching Award from Harvard University for his excellent courses on Music Theory. At UCSD he will teach Music 103 (Composition), Music 102 (Music Theory), Music 207 (Graduate Seminar on Chinese Music), as well as individual instruction in Composition.

Clinton Tolley

Assistant Professor
Department of Philosophy

Clinton Tolley received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, an outstanding school for the history of philosophy. Tolley’s research, in the history of modern philosophy, focuses on the history of logic and its development from Kant through Hegel and on to Frege. His future projects will turn to the rise of modern logic in the nineteenth century. His dissertation examines one famously difficult topic in this area, namely Kant’s understanding of logic and the role it plays in his transcendental philosophy. Tolley’s treatment of this topic reveals his impressive scholarly strength and philosophical sophistication. We expect he will play a major role in our graduate and undergraduate programs in all aspects, but especially in the history of philosophy, Kant and the post-Kantians. He has taught courses at the University of Chicago as a Tutorial Instructor with full responsibility for design and execution of a seminar for advanced undergraduate philosophy majors. He has also taught a course for high school students at Wheaton Academy as a Visiting Instructor. In addition, he has significant experience as a Teaching Assistant at University of Chicago. Student evaluations for his independently taught courses,
as well as responses regarding his “TAing,” indicate he is a well-respected, competent, and approachable instructor. Honors and awards received to date include: Sawyer Fellow in Humanities; Andrew W. Mellon Dissertation-Year Fellowship; Affiliated Fellow, Franke Institute (University of Chicago); University Fellowship, Humanities Division, University of Chicago; Ford Foundation Pre-Doctoral Diversity Fellowship; Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship in Humanistic Studies; and a Summer Seminar, “Deconstruction and Hermeneutics,” Pew Younger Scholar.

Eric Geiger

Lecturer with Potential for Security of Employment
Department of Theatre and Dance

Eric Geiger was trained as a dancer at the Alvin Ailey American Dance Center on a full merit scholarship and studied with some of the most influential teachers in New York City. Following this training Geiger embarked on a career climbing up the ladder of prestige in the dance world working for a year in Europe, then with Joyce Trisler's company in New York. Afterward, he was engaged by the Bill T.Jones/Arnie Zane Company, where he spent three years. Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company is widely recognized as one of the most important modern dance companies in the world. After this engagement, he returned to Europe as a dancer with the famed Lyon Opera Ballet and worked under the direction of leading choreographers such as William Forsythe and Maguy Marin. When he came back to the U.S., he worked with the ground-breaking Oberlin Dance Collective and currently continues his work as The Associate Artistic Director of McCaleb Dance in San Diego. With McCaleb's company he has created several new works such as Post and Lintel which experiments with aspects of architecture, time, space and the role of humans in a built environment. As a teacher he served as the resident ballet instructor for the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company as well as facilitating outreach workshops both nationally and internationally. He has also been teaching various dance techniques within the community of San Diego since 1998. At UCSD he will be teaching modern dance technique, contemporary ballet, choreography, and plans on developing new courses in the integration of choreography with scenography and digital media. Geiger will be receiving an MA in Inter-disciplinary Studies combining Scenic Design with Choreography from San Diego State University in the winter of 2007.

Naomi Iizuka

Professor
Department of Theatre and Dance

Professor Iizuka joins the Department of Theatre and Dance in 2007 as a Professor and Head of the department’s MFA program in Playwriting. Professor Iizuka received her undergraduate degree in English from Yale University and her MFA in Playwriting from UCSD in 1992. Her plays, including SkinPolaroid Stories and 36 Views, have received international attention and productions at some of the most important theatres in the U.S., including the American Repertory Theatre, Actor’s Theatre of Louisville and the New York Shakespeare Festival. As a teacher, she has been a guest artist at the Playwright’s Lab at the University of Iowa, the Michener Center at the University of Texas and the Saratoga International Theatre Institute. She is the recipient of numerous awards, the most recent being The Alpert Award in Theater, 2005. Prior to her appointment at UCSD, she was Professor of Drama at UC Santa Barbara. Her teaching assignments at UCSD will include a rotation through the full compliment of undergraduate playwriting courses and primary training and mentorship of graduate playwriting students. Among her most crucial instructional duties will be the supervision of the Baldwin New Play Festival, the department’s nationally recognized showcase for its MFA playwrights. Professor Iizuka’s work as a playwright proceeds on multiple fronts. In recent years she has ventured into research on a narrowly focused community issues, such as the social history of the Butcher Town neighborhood in Louisville that resulted in the play, At the Vanishing Point. Work of this nature, as well as other plays exploring the American experience continues.

Kyong Park

Associate Professor of Public Culture and Urbanism
Department of Visual Arts

Kyong Park was born in Korea and moved to the United States at the age of twelve. He received a BS in Architecture from the University of Michigan in 1978 and participated in a post-graduate independent program at the Institute of Architecture and Urban Studies in 1979. He was the founding director of Centrala Foundation for Future Cities in Rotterdam [2005], a co-curator of “Europe Lost and Found,” a project on future geography of Europe, and a founding member of “Lost Highway,” a mass expedition through nine cities in the Western Balkans. He is the editor of Urban Ecology: Detroit and Beyond [2005], a co-curator for “Shrinking Cities” in Berlin [2002-2004], the founding director of International Center for Urban Ecology in Detroit [1999-2001], a curator of Kwangju Biennale in South Korea [1997], a Loeb Fellow at Harvard University [1996], and the founder/director of StoreFront for Art and Architecture in New York [1982-98]. As an architect, artist, urban theorist and activist Kyong Park's research and artistic practice focuses on the city. He is particularly interested in the conditions which give rise to shrinking cities (Detroit, for instance) and expanding cities (as in Asia) and to the formation and reconfiguration of border cities (such as San Diego/Tijuana). His current work is focused on Asian cities. "The New Silk Roads" is a research project based on a planned expedition from Istanbul to Tokyo. This expedition is a way of gathering images and information in order to understand the relation between the physical movements of products/labor/resources and the immaterial movements of information/capital/services over the real and virtual landscapes of Asia. Its purpose is to better understand the cultural, political and economic interplay between East and West. Kyong Park has been appointed as an artist in Public Culture within the Visual Arts Department and he will be working to develop a program in Public Culture. He will teach across a range of courses, both practical and historical/theoretical, contributing to the undergraduate studio art area with project-driven classes on the city, and to the art history area with a course on the Asian city. At the graduate level he will teach a course entitled "Curating Public Culture."

Michael Trigilio

Lecturer with Potential for Security of Employment
Department of Visual Arts

Michael Trigilio is a multimedia artist who just moved to San Diego from Oakland, CA. Born and raised in San Antonio, Texas, he received his B.A. in Humanities from the University of Texas at San Antonio. His fear of religion notwithstanding, he was ordained as a lay Buddhist priest in 1997, a role from which he resigned five years later. He received his M.F.A. from Mills College in 2003. Michael's work is inspired by material that balances sarcasm and prayer, giving rise to works that examine religion, humor, politics, and mass-media. His new digital film, "Thanks for Giving My Number Back" (2006), explores the thin lines between love and death, fantasy and reality, hope and helplessness. Equal parts self-portraiture and science fiction, the story shapes itself into a tangle of chuckles, heartache, and anxiety. His video serial, the "Untitled Book Series" (2001-2004) is a non-linear suite of short videos anchored in relationships to specific books. Other recent installations and video projects have incorporated superhero action figures, Zoloft pill bottles, and of course, religion. Michael's work has been presented at the Anthology Film Archives in New York, Southern Exposure Gallery and New Langton Arts in San Francisco, and the Musée d'Art Moderne et Contemporain in Strasbourg. Michael is a founding member of the independent radio project Neighborhood Public Radio which recently finished a nine-month exhibition funded through a grant from the Creative Work Fund. Michael will teach a range of Media courses including the core lower division course, Introduction to Media, which combines production and theory/history.  His experience and expertise as a sound artist will be reflected in a course on Sound.