2006/07 New Faculty

Jane C.M. Kuo

Lecturer with Potential for Security of Employment
History/Chinese Studies

Jane Kuo received her Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from Arizona State University in 1992. Her teaching career started in 1974 when she developed a business-focused Chinese language program at Thunderbird, the Gravin School of International Management, in Glendale, Arizona, where she was promoted to Professor of Chinese and ultimately selected as an outstanding professor three times by Thunderbird’s student government. Dr. Kuo is a leader in business Chinese instruction in the U. S. and has recently published two widely used textbooks on business Chinese (with different editions in Boston and Beijing). Her research interests include the study of theories and pedagogy in language teaching and acquisition, as well as the analysis of techniques in language proficiency testing and assessment. She has been active in presenting her work at conferences and in setting up international partnerships in language training in China and Japan. Dr. Kuo will be Director of the Chinese Language Program at UCSD, which enrolls over 1,000 students annually, and she will offer Chinese courses at various levels of instruction. Her extensive experience in administration, teaching, and outreach programs will help guide UCSD’s Chinese Language Program in the years ahead as it achieves ever more prominent visibility nationwide and worldwide.

Patrick Patterson

Assistant Professor
History

Patrick Patterson received a J.D. from the University of Virginia in 1988. After working as an attorney in the Bay Area, he returned to graduate school at the University of Michigan, where he received his Ph.D. in Modern Balkan and East Central European history in 2001. He has command of an impressive array of foreign languages necessary to work in his field (Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, Slovenian, Hungarian, Czech, German, Italian, and French), and he enjoys a reading knowledge of Slovak and Russian. Since 2001, Dr. Patterson has been a Lecturer in Eleanor Roosevelt College’s “Making of the Modern World” (MMW) course at UCSD. For his work in the MMW sequence, he received the Class of 2005 Outstanding Faculty Award. This past year Dr. Patterson has been on research leave doing field work in Hungary, Serbia, and Montenegro. The recipient of three major national fellowships (from the National Council for Eurasian and East European Research, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the International Research and Exchanges Board), he is writing a book on socialist consumer society in Eastern Europe, provisionally titled Communism Consumed: The Culture of the Market and Everyday Life in Yugoslavia, Hungary, and the German Democratic Republic. Dr. Patterson will continue to teach in the MMW program, and he will also offer courses on “ International Law, War Crimes, and Genocide;” “Immigration, Ethnicity, and Identity in Europe;” and “Eastern and Central European History.”

Amelia Glaser

Assistant Professor
Russian Literature

Dr. Glaser received her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Stanford University in 2004, and has been awarded post-doctoral fellowships at the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute (HURI) in 2004, and at the University of Pennsylvania Center for Advanced Judaic Studies (CAJS) in 2005. During 2005-06 she taught as a Lecturer in Slavic Literature and Jewish Studies at Stanford University.  Dr. Glaser’s dissertation, The Marketplace and the Church: Jews, Slavs and the Literature of Exchange, 1829-1929, was the recipient of Stanford University’s  Bradley Rubidge Memorial Dissertation Award in Comparative Literature in 2006.  Among her many other awards are a Fulbright-Hayes Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Award from the US Dept. of Education in 2002-2003 and the Geballe Dissertation Fellowship from the Stanford Humanities Center in 2003-2004.  Her main research involves the comparative study of language, literature, and culture in Russian, Ukrainian, and Yiddish.  She has recently translated, co-edited, and published a book-length volume on Yiddish Poets entitled Proletpen: America’s Rebel Yiddish Poets ( 2005), in addition to several articles on Russian Literature. A highly regarded instructor, Dr. Glaser will teach regularly in our three-quarter survey of Russian and Soviet Literature (LTRU 110ABC), as well as more advanced courses on specific Russian authors, periods, or genres for the Literature Department. Her training in comparative literature and in cultural studies will enable her to teach for the Literatures of the World curriculum, as well as that of the proposed Cultural Studies major.  Dr. Glaser will also be affiliated with UCSD’s Judaic Studies Program.  

Dayna Kalleres

Assistant Professor
Literature/Program for the Study of Religion

Dayna Kalleres received her Ph.D. in the Department of Religious Studies at Brown University, with a specialization in Early Christianity, in May of 2002.  She was awarded the Charlotte Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship from the Woodrow Wilson Foundation and the Brown University Dissertation Fellowship from Brown. Her dissertation was entitled Exorcising the Devil to Silence Christ’s Enemies: Ritualized Speech Practices in Late Antique Christianity.  Dr. Kalleres spent three years as a Stanford Humanities Post-Doctoral Fellow, and held appointments both as a lecturer at Stanford and as an Assistant Professor at the University of the Pacific prior to her appointment at UCSD.  Her research has focused on the major fourth century catechetical training lectures by Cyril of Jerusalem and John Chrysostom.  She is currently writing a book on John Chrysostom as well as several articles that examine the deployment of the categories of gender, sexuality, and the body in the formation of religious boundaries in late antiquity and the intersection between ritual practice and theological conflict. Her teaching and research interests include an exploration of the relationship between "magical" and religious (Christian, polytheist and Jewish) ritual practices. Kalleres promises to be an experienced, sensitive teacher. She has received enthusiastic reviews from former students, and we anticipate that she will be a colleague who will bring great energy and commitment to the further growth and development of UCSD’s Program for the Study of Religion.  Her arrival will help to broaden the Literature Department curriculum in the field of Early Christianity and related topics.  Her expertise in the History of Religion promises to be a resource to colleagues and graduate students campus-wide, especially in such areas as ancient, medieval, and renaissance literature.  It is anticipated that she will eventually also teach classes to benefit undergraduates of all majors in one or more of the college humanities programs on campus.

Margaret Loose

Assistant Professor
Victorian Literature

Margaret Loose completed all requirements for her Ph.D. in English at the University of Iowa in 2005, and will receive her degree in the Spring of 2006.  Her primary interests are Victorian Literature and 19th Century British Literature, with a focus in poetics and literature by women and the working class . Her future research plans include a study that takes a longer view of nineteenth-century poetic form from late Romanticism through the Victorian age and a study of Elizabeth Gaskell’s novel Mary Barton: A Tale of Manchester Life (1848). We anticipate that Dr. Loose will be an excellent teacher based on her past teaching experience and the engaging, effective lecture style she displayed at the time of her campus visit.  As a graduate student, she was already affiliated with the University of California’s Dickens Project (at UCSC), which is a research unit that involves a consortium of other major universities including Harvard, Princeton, Columbia, Cornell, Stanford, Rutgers, Birbeck College (University of London), and others.  She will now be UCSD’s official representative in this multi-campus research unit. Her appointment will reinvigorate Victorian Studies at UCSD’s Literature Department and she will offer both graduate and undergraduate courses in Victorian fiction and poetry.

Monte Johnson

Assistant Professor
Philosophy

Monte Johnson comes to us from St. Louis University where he has been an Assistant Professor since 2004. Johnson’s field is History of Ancient Philosophy, his main focus being on the works of Aristotle, but also on other classical philosophers such as Lucretius and philosophers of the early modern period. Johnson was awarded his Ph. D. in 2003 from the University of Toronto, a world-class institution for the history of philosophy and for classics. Upon completion of his Ph. D., he was awarded a Killam postdoctoral fellowship to study at the University of British Columbia, and was appointed a scholar at Green College. He is fully fluent in ancient Greek, as well as in Latin, German and French. Johnson used his postdoctoral year to reorganize and develop the main ideas of his dissertation for a book, Aristotle On Teleology. This monograph was published by Oxford University Press 2005. Johnson has also published other scholarly material of singular importance, including, with Catherine Wilson, a fine piece on the epicurean philosopher, Lucretius and the relation of his ideas to modern science. He also has written an insightful article on Pierre Gassendi, a contemporary of Descartes, who favored a materialistic rather than Descartes’ dualistic approach to nature. Finally, he has a scholarly piece on the philosophically vexed Greek term ousia. Johnson was awarded an NEH fellowship to pursue his research on a poorly understood text (Aristotle’s Protrepticus) along with another scholar, D.S. Hutchinson. They aim to produce a new edition – translated, with commentary and an introduction. Johnson will play a prominent role in our graduate and undergraduate programs in all aspects, but especially in the history component, including the history of science. He will also play a role in the Science Studies Program. His unusual breadth means that can teach a wide range of courses, and the clear evidence is that he teaches brilliantly at all levels.

Christian Wüthrich

Assistant Professor
Philosophy

Christian Wüthrich received his Ph.D. in 2006 from the University of Pittsburgh, which is the top-ranked school in philosophy of science and has been so for the last 40 years. His field is philosophy of physics, and his dissertation research concerns foundational issues in loop quantum gravity, a competitor to string theory. He has an exceptionally strong background in theoretical physics, having done an MSc in theoretical physics at the University of Bern. He also has impressive strength in philosophy of science, having done an MPhil in history and philosophy of science at University of Cambridge, before coming to do graduate research in the department at Pittsburgh. He already has in press one paper in the premier journal of the field, Philosophy of Science, and he has co-authored a paper in Physics Letters. Additionally, he has co-authored with John Earman a major research article in The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. He has given seven presentations of his work (not related to job talks) and has acquired a significant reputation in the field. Beyond his technical expertise in theoretical physics, Wüthrich has great breadth which extends to issues in the wider field of philosophy of science and to the history of science. Wüthrich will play a major role in our graduate and undergraduate programs in all aspects, but especially in the philosophy of science and history of science components. His enviable breadth means that can teach a wide range of courses, including philosophy of physics, logic, spacetime, history of physics, and the clear evidence is that he teaches brilliantly. Advanced Approaches to Science Studies.

Robert Castro

Assistant Professor
Theatre and Dance

Mr. Castro received his Master of Fine Arts degree in Directing from the celebrated Yale School of Drama in 1998. He was later the recipient of a Fox Foundation Fellowship (2000) and a Van Lier Directing Fellowship (2003-2003). In addition, he has been a resident or associate artist at such significant venues as the Institute for the Arts and Civic Dialogue at Harvard University (1998-1999), the Mark Taper Forum (2003-2005), and El Teatro Campesino. Mr. Castro was a member of the Lincoln Center Theater Directors Lab in 1998 and a member of the New York Theatre Workshop in 2000. Mr. Castro’s productions feature a formal and highly visual approach utilizing masks, stylized movement, and choreography. They have been mounted at some of the premier regional theatres and performance schools in the nation, including the Santa Fe Opera, the Mark Taper Forum, and the La Jolla Playhouse. Mr. Castro has been a frequent collaborator with some of the towering figures of the American stage such as director Peter Sellars. He has taught at the Mark Taper Forum in Los Angeles, in the “Speak to Me” Program, and at San Francisco State University. Mr. Castro’s early interest in drama was grounded in the work of the father of Chicano theatre, Luis Valdez. His first professional experience was at Valdez’s artistic home, El Teatro Campesino in San Juan Bautista. Mr. Castro subsequently directed many plays that arose from the Chicano and Latino theatre worlds. Over time, the scope of his work widened to include the large-scale epic theatre that now characterizes his career. Mr. Castro will offer courses in Chicano/a and Latino/a theatre and in acting and directing. He will also direct both undergraduate and graduate stage productions.

Kim Rubinstein

Assistant Professor
Theatre and Dance

Kim Rubinstein received her BS in Theatre at Northwestern University in 1977. Since that time she has been active as a professional director working at theatres nationally. Most recently, she has served as the Associate Artistic Director at the Long Wharf Theatre in New Haven, Connecticut where she has directed such works as Noel Coward's “Private Lives,” Shakespeare's “Midsummer Night's Dream,” and the musical, “Guys and Dolls.” Though she has directed Shakespeare in a number of venues, she also has an interest in new plays having directed Jeff Carey's “Pan and Boone” in Chicago and “The Intelligent Design of Jenny Chow” in Portland and San Jose. Prior to her appointment at the Long Wharf, Professor Rubinstein taught acting at Northwestern University for ten years where she helped shape its highly successful undergraduate acting program. She is the recipient of three Helen Hayes Awards for her production of “Baby with the Bathwater” at the Berkshire Theatre Festival, and an After Dark Award in Chicago for “Pan and Boone.” She was also nominated for the prestigious Alan Schneider Award for Excellence in Directing. Rubinstein will be teaching acting in the Department of Theatre and Dance and is expected to offer substantial leadership in the provisioning of the undergraduate acting curriculum.

Gabor Tompa

Professor
Theatre and Dance

Professor Tompa received his training at the Theatre and Film Academy in Bucharest, Romania and began working as a professional director in 1981. Since then, he has directed more than 60 productions worldwide including plays by Shakespeare, Moliere, Chekhov, Beckett, Bulgokhov, Camus and Ionesco. In 1985 he was appointed Artistic Director of the Hungarian Theatre in Cluj, Romania, a post he has held up to the present time. He served as Head of Directing at the Theatre Academy in Tirgu Mures, Romania and has been a guest teacher at the State University of Cluj, Brunel University, London, and Institut del Teatre Barcelona. Professor Tompa is the recipient of many awards and has received widespread recognition in Europe for his physically adventurous and conceptually audacious productions of classic plays. He received the 2002 UNITER Award for Excellence for the many achievements of his career. His film, “Chinese Defense,” won the Best First Feature Award at the International Film Festival in Salerno, Italy in 1999. Mr. Tompa is also the author of several volumes of poetry and essays on the theatre. Mr. Tompa will serve as Head of the MFA Directing program and teach undergraduate courses in the History of Directing and in Directing.